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06 Sep

Adding a Touch of Nature with Help from Classic Cedar Shingle Siding

In a Berkeleyside.com article published August 7, 2013, writer Lucia Howard was interviewed on the release of her new book Shingle Style: Living in San Francisco's Brown Shingles, which covers the distinctive brown shingle style found in and around San Francisco. Said brown shingles can most notably be found among Berkeley homes, with the academic and dynamic lifestyles led by the people in that area inspiring the use of the iconic shingles.


Berkeley's BrownYou don't have to be a college student or professor to appreciate classic cedar shingle siding though. The cladding is a great way to imbue a traditional look upon any home while providing a tasteful means to protect the outer walls. Shingle siding is also great as an insulator, and can improve a home's ability to retain heat during cold seasons.


According to the creator of the brown shingle book, living in a house adorned with unpainted wooden shingles a hundred years ago was a way to convey “reverence for the forest.” Those who used wooden shingles in the past did so to be closer to nature, and such homes were usually lush in plants and foliage. Berkeley had the most ideal landscape and climate for such homes, hence a good number of brown shingle houses could be found there.


Shingles were a huge design fad back in the day, and were considered uniquely American by the historian Vincent Scully. While the brown shingles are a West Coast thing, even the East Coast has its own shingle design elements, making the design universal to the country. As an enduring design element, shingles will continue to grace American homes, regardless of what they're made of—wood, metal, fireproof materials, and so on.


Wooden shingles might strike some as too old, but they can be a surprising fit for the most modern of homes. However, not all kinds of wood will qualify for decent siding due to varying degrees of coloration and sturdiness. Interested homeowners should look only for the most durable cedar siding shingles, like those from WoodRoof.com, to fit over their houses.


Shingles might be a common sight on older homes, but that doesn't mean newer houses shouldn't try it. The brown shingle homes featured in the article prove that their beauty is timeless. Folks should seriously consider decking their residences in cedar wood shingles for that nostalgic and natural look.

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